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prices will triple in america. that is that the action we want to take to rejuvenate our economy. what can we do to preserve jobs in the u.s. and in indiana? i believe you do it through tax cuts. we are losing jobs to mexico. we have the second highest corporate tax rate in the world. why don't we incentivize businesses to grow in our great state? let's not penalize them for sending jobs elsewhere. >> i agree with that. while trade agreements must be fair and must scrutinize them carefully, it is important as a nation that the u.s. be able to export to other countries. in the and that derives a great number of jobs from the export of goods. we have to be careful not to cut off our nose to spite our face. we need to provide the basis for jobs to be preserved in america. the incentives through lower regulations -- this administration is imposing taxes on small business, in opposing that on indiana is costing us all lot of money -- imposing that on indiana is costing us. >> benjamin franklin said no country was ever destroyed from free trade. what we have done with nafta has been one part
. not violent -- not racist, not violent, just no longer silent." c'mon, let's go! ♪ ♪ >> glenn: hello, america. if you have been a listener of mine for gosh, it's almost been ten years now. me on the radio. then you might remember a time when hi radio show was based in comedy. i used to try to -- it was much more like jon stewart really on the radio. we would look at the news of the day. and try to make our points but make them in a funny way. obviously, i was conservetive, where jon stewart is not. but today, today, over the last ten years i have found myself in a position where i never intended on being. you know, the show is day-by-day is about as funny as smallpox quite honestly. and there is a lot of stuff i do that i don't want to. recently i got a lot of heat for telling "forbes" magazine that my company is an entertainment company. but only after they printed half of that quote from that conversation were people saying that. when they went back and wrote another story and finished the rest of the line, people understand what i was saying. my company is an entertainment compacompany, bu
. more on how the ash cloud is actually headed to north america in a minute. first some flights could actually be taking off in europe airspace. most of northern europe remains closed. some airlines plan to fly between 8,000 and 9,000 of the 2,000 scheduled flights today. restrictions over scottish airspace will be lifted tuesday and germany's aviation authority has given lufthansa the okay to fly 50 planes back to germany with about 15,000 passengers on board. meanwhile britain sent in the royal navy to bring stranded people back home. 150,000 brits stranded worldwide. that ash cloud continues to move its way westward, as i mentioned. will it be reaching the shores of north america any time soon? joining us from d.c., geologists with the u.s. geological survey. thanks for joining us. >> good morning. >> a lot of people woke up and saw headlines that this ash cloud would be headed toward north america. explain what's happening here. >> well, there is a high pressure system north of greenland sending a small ton of ash over towards the area between greenland and north america. the mode
. a sake -- sacred red cow is led to slaughter. roll up your sleeves, here we go. hello, america. this week has been a primer to get your brain to think in a different mode. i liken it to america has cancer. now, is it stage one, stage networks stage four cancer? i think we're headed toward stage four cancer. how much to we have to cut? what do we have to do? thinking out of the box. we're not cutting spending, we're -- i mean it's insane what's going on. people at the coto institute have been putting budget proposal together and they're not making friends because people don't want their slice of the pie taken away. we're all going to lose a slice of pie. our relationship may be on the rocks after tonight. i'll send you candy or flowers because we zero in on even my own sacred cow tonight, national security and defense. according to the economist, america's overwhelmingly feel of cutting spending is the best way to reduce the deficit. cut spending, 5% they raised taxes. this is the one the political elite wants to do because this one is hard. as soon as you get the scalp out they run for th
colonial times, immigrants from around the growth have traveled to america to seek their fortunes. from the industrial revolution to the great depression, the united states has had their share of ups and downs. whether she is experiencing a recession or an economic boom, america remains the land were opportunity is abundant. >> we really kind of stumbled into it. when i was in high school, my business partner was a junior. we were in a band and we wanted to make our own band shirts, but we did not want to pay anyone to do it. he bought some supplies and we'd made to our own frame, are less green at of just would that be cut. we stressed the mesh over it and did everything very primitive glee. -- primitive. we started printing for some other bands. we started doing some stuff with schools just for fun. we ask my dad for a mini loan and he gave it to us. >> i decided to open a gourmet pasta company because it has been in my family for three generations. we are third-generation. it has been in our family since 1926 someone to carry on the tradition. >> i found something for me to retire to
will support and defend the constitution and laws of the united states of america against all enemies foreign and domestic, that i will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that i will bear arms on behalf of the united states when required by law, that i will perform non-combat service in the armed forces of the united states when required by law, that i will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by law, that i take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, so help me god. congratulations, new citizens. [applause] . it takes a very special individual to serve and defend a nation that is not yet fully your own. that is what each of you are doing, and that his testimony to your strong sense of patriotism. our nation thanks you for your service. we owe the freedoms we enjoy to the sacrifices of men and women like you. since september 11, 2001, the united states citizenship and immigration services as naturalized over 58,000 members of our armed services. since last year we have offered non citizen enlistees the oppor
9/11, the horror of what we witnessed, the means of terrorism and potential wmd strike in america that could collapse our economic system and drive down trust and confidence in the national institution and make the united states move with their objective, that in my judgment is all about war. >> okay. general mcmaster. >> i'd like to make a couple question points. prior to 9/11 we saw the security emerging from the most industrialized nations. when we saw that threat, we saw them mobilize. we could respond to that. i think now what bruce has mentioned, weapons of mass effect, the ability of terrorist organization to do something fundamentally different, terrorism is not a new phenomenon. what is new is the access to these disproductive weapons and also communications and the ability to take the agree -- grievances and connect them. i think it's for us to remember this is ill religious enemy who uses to motivate largely undereducated or illiterate young people to their cost. they exacerbate weakness and use weakness where there's lawlessness, and rule of law. for us to be effective
of the best selling books "the century" and "in search for america." todd has also taught journalism, documentary film, and constitutional law as a visiting professor at wesleyan university and he is a knight fellow at yale law school. it's my pleasure to introduce him now. ladies and gentlemen, please join me in welcoming todd brewster. [applause] >> thank you, david, and welcome everybody, to our main event for the peter jennings project. it's a joy to be addressing you all, introducing this main event, could be received if partner high pressure with the center for oral history. you occasionally hear army officers about how war ought tore left to the warriors and civil affairs to the civil politicians. you also here "war is politics" by other means, hence the dilemma. where should the line properly fall between civil and military affairs. the framers negotiated this path with a delicate penmanship. the constitution gives power to congress to provide and maintain a navy, but an army must be reappropriated every two years, so fearful were hadell madison and hamilton that a standing a
. cable's latest gift to america. >> this year studentcam competition asked middle and high school students to create a video dealing with one the country's greatest strength or the challenge. here's one of the third place winners. >> just from the time this video have been playing, two people have already died from hunger. although world hunger is very important issue, i'm going to focus about one country. a country where 49 million people are struggling with hunger. but only 26.5 million get aid for it. a country where the number of people struggling with hunger has increased by 13 million people over the past year. and the country where one out of every eight people are struggling with hunger. this is the country that we live in. >> there's no excuse for the staggering number of hungry americans. last year 49 million people were in danger of going hungry. more than 4 million children didn't get enough to eat. >> the number of people seeking emergency food assistance in new york city is up 20.9% over last year. >> help the grow growing number of people who don't have enough to ea
america." [applause] the judges said that herpes took a different look at a part of afghanistan that is rarely seen. for women in remote northeastern afghanistan it is not just buy ied's that pose a challenge on a daily basis. it is also the simple act of giving life. >> far away, she has delivered her baby. the baby is dead. it is her second child to die of the same birth defect. outside, her mother breaks the sad news to the father, but the mood in the delivery room is not what you would expect. remember, so many women died giving birth that surviving itself is a triumph over the odds. take you for my life, she says. my life is more important. i will have a child again. [applause] >> hello. it is really wonderful to be here at the awards dinner of the radio and television correspondents. in my work, i do not often get to stay in places with 24 hours of electricity and all this running water. it is especially terrific because of these young girls, eva and nicole. sadly, christine could not be here. [applause] did your mother come? where is melaney? hello, melaney. [applause] ho
on a playground. >> no administration in america's history would ever have considered such a step we just found out president obama is supporting today. you know, that's kind of like getting out there on the playground, a bunch of kids ready to fight and one of the kids saying, go ahead, punch me in the face and i'm not going to retaliate. no. it's unacceptable. this is another thing that the american public, the more that they find out what is a part of it agenda, they're going to rise up and they're going to say no more. national defense, national security is the number one job of the federal government. >> that woman is an idiot. earlier on abc's "world news tonight," the president asked by george stephanopoulos to respond to sarah palin. >> i really have no response to that. last i checked, sarah palin's not much of an expert on nuclear issues. >> all right. he put it better than i did. let's turn to richard bert, former ambassador to germy, the u.s.'s first negative negotiate yater for the first s.t.a.r.t. treaty signed by president bush in 1991. he is not u.s. chairman of global zero, an
play is serving only to muddy the waters furnished in an effort to keep america safe. which is what we are all supposed to be about. i personally thought that the bush phrase global war on terror was way too veiling. early -- too vague. team obama made it less precise to overseas contingencies operations. i love that now they have changed the name again this time to countering violent extremism. or cve. when a nigerian tried to blow up a plane over detroit last december it was appropriate to call him violent extremist. fort hood homegrown violent extremist. how about that chech neon suicide bomber. what is the one common denominator with all these cases? are we even allowed to ask that question? and then the most important question of all, does retiring the phrase islamic radicalism actually help keep america safer? look, president obama is right about one thing, this is not a war that's going to be won by military might alone. we will need to use every tool at our disposal. president obama should do more to call on all peace-loving muslims to rise up against the ruthless radicals to i
of -- piece of history. check it out. auction ends friday. good night, america america. >> how long do his advisors think it will take to help president obama's policies to help job seekers get back into the ball game? is president hamid karzai threatening to join the taliban and a major outbreak of violence rocks the baghdad region. this is "special report". >> good evening, this is a fox news alert. there has been an explosion in a mine in raleigh county, west va vachl a state official says there are six people dod daed and 21 unaccounted for. it happened at the upper big branch mine about 30 min miles south of charleston. the mine crews are headed to the scene. we'll monitor developments and have updates as warranted. president obama today took part in two very traditional activities, hosting annual white house easter egg roll and throwing out first pitch of the new baseball season. but there to is more on his mind than just fun and games. senior white house correspondent major jarret reports the president has his eye on the economic playing field. >> reporter: it's a strange met
and the people of the united states of america not president obama. the issues that i would like to work on are the issues that are before us now that i mentioned earlier. i would like to pass the fair tax. i think it will work. i would like health-care reform that would work. without forcing them to buy health care under the threat of a fine or going to jail. another thing i think that is important that is not being addressed is the board is security between the united states and mexico and our border security all around the country. it is a little disconcerting to mention. there were 17,000 murders in northern mexico and the last three years. that is scary. 650 kidnappings in arizona. something has to be some. >> i think our most immediate needs are to work on creating jobs in the united states and in arkansas. i would wear to eliminate the tax provision that action against american companies an incentive to move jobs overseas. replace those with tax credits so that we can create jobs here at home and said the more bailout for wall street. but put those funds into loans for arkansas sm
opinion. this gets back to this anger in america concept that seems so prevalent now. you've got to ask, why was goldman creating these securities and puts people in a position to have to defend them after the fact. i don't think that's necessary hi fair to goldman sachs to have to put them in that position. they believed they were helping their clients, but it just didn't look good. >> well, not only doesn't look good, but makes people feel that this is the smoking gun. accurately or not, people feel that tells you everything you need to know about the way wall street is operating. this is what lloyd blankfein had to say -- there's reporting today "the new york times" that in fact, the investigators are now looking at how high up this actually went and whether all the way up to the ceo there were people involved, top executives at goldman who signed off on what this one man was doing. >> but if i understand what we've heard so far about the core of goldman's defense, it won't have to do with who in the firm knew about it, but the merits of the case. whether that was a material fact tha
diversity in america. "washington journal" is next. . . our question for you this morning is about financial regulatory reform. do you think it will get bipartisan support? the lines are -- you can also e-mail up -- e-mail us at journal@c-span.org or twitter. senators will face a future -- crucial test vote on far reaching legislation to overhaul the nation's regulatory system. republicans said sunday they plan to block efforts to move forward unless democrats altered several elements. meanwhile, democrats and obama officials spent much of the day finalizing strict new rules to rein in the huge derivatives trade -- other coverage of that in "the washington times." republican leaders said yesterday their ranks are unified and determined to shoot down a key test vote today, potentially embarrassing scenario for democrats seeking to advance a major item of president obama's agenda. our question to you is, do you think bipartisan support will materialize today on the financial regulatory bill. and it's not today, because of differences between the parties -- do you think it will be different, pe
it to believe it. we're back here after this. somewhere in america... the slightest breeze harbors immense power. the tallest buildings leave the lightest footprints. a fifty-ton train makes barely a mark on the environment. and a country facing climate change finds climate solutions. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest questions. and the over sixty thousand people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. breaking up is hard to do. so allstate will do it for you. switch to allstate, and your new agent will... help tell your old insurance company goodbye. saving you that uncomfortable breakup moment. and serious cash. drivers who switched saved an average of $396 a year. $473 if they dumped geico. breaking up is easy to do. ♪ remember when that's allstate's stand. are you in good hands? ♪ i was just in town for a few days and i was wondering if i could say hi to the doctor. - is he in? - he's in copenhagen. - oh, well, that's nice. - but you can still see him. - you just said he was in-- - copenhagen. - come on. - that's pretty far. - doc,
like never forget, miners keep america's lights on. but then saying we've got to not let this happen again. and so we expect to hear the president say we can't bring back the lives of these 29 miners lost. we can do everything possible to avoid such a tragedy happening in the future. alex? >> and the president doing so on the heels of at least getting a little bit of a break with his wife there in north carolina. we weren't given a lot of details about what they were doing. they want to have the press following them around but seems like a good break for them? >> reporter: the press was able to follow in the motorcade, kept at a little bit of a distance but every now and then you got a glimpse of them. the president and first lady went without their daughters but they were able to spend time with friends who flew in from chicago so they've had dinners and golf and that sort of thing. >> a little grown-up time. athena jones at the white house. >>> msnbc will air the president's remarks at the memorial, our coverage begins at 3:00 p.m. eastern for you today. >>> a newly released group
're in the human energy business. chevron. somewhere in america... there's a home by the sea powered by the wind on the plains. there's a hospital where technology has a healing touch. there's a factory giving old industries new life. and there's a train that got a whole city moving again. somewhere in america, the toughest questions are answered every day. because somewhere in america, more than sixty thousand people spend every day answering them. siemens. answers. i can download files up to 10x faster than 3g... outside. i can stream the movie "airplane" to my cell phone... at the airport. i can have a crystal-clear videoconference with my clients... ...muffin basket or something... ...while working offsite, or share five high-speed connections for online gaming... while enjoying the great outdoors. [ video game sound effects ] eat it, yoshi! what can you do with 4g? [ male announcer ] experience 4g from sprint. it's more than a wireless network. deaf, hard-of-hearing and people with speech disabilities, it's a wireless revolution. access www.sprintrelay.com. [ male announcer ] we call it the
our viewers think about this. a question today is do you think america has fallen behind as we've -- joe has just said? we have. why do you think it's true when it comes to protecting the environment. e-mail us by logging on to cnn.com/hln and we're going to be checking out your views a little bit later. >>> now, take charge of your career. if you've been out of work for a few months and you do find a job, you are probably thrilled. good for you. but starting any new job is going to be hard and it's even harder after a long lay-off, so here's how to make a successful reentry back into the work force. "the wall street journal" says, one, read up about your industry. have your boss describe your job very specifically so you can get as ready as possible. then a few day s before your first day, go do a test run. see how long it's going to get you to shower, to get there, whether it's finding your way on the road or taking a subway so you're going to be on time and ready and confident on your first day. now, this one may be the hardest. don't make the same mistakes twice. now, maybe
for your leadership on energy and thank you for building a better america. [applause] >> thank you secretary for those remarks. he is really a very true friend of the building trades and he demonstrates that to us every day. the building trades look forward to many years of close collaboration with you, dr. chu. brothers and sisters, that concludes today's session. please take a look at the workshop schedule for this afternoon. you'll have the opportunity to get in-depth information about many of the issues that we heard about this morning. the 2010 legislative conference is now in recess until 9:00 a.m. sharp tomorrow. thank you. >> the arizona: assigned an immigration bill that was criticized hours earlier by president obama as misguided. if there is reason to suspect that someone is in the country illegally, they can be questioned. senator john mccain, who is facing a primary challenge this year has threatened to filibuster any legislation that does not secure borders first. tonight, a debate between the three democratic candidates for arkansas' senate seat. live coverage begins
old industries new life. and there's a train that got a whole city moving again. somewhere in america, the toughest questions are answered every day. because somewhere in america, more than sixty thousand people spend every day answering them. siemens. answers. so, at national, i go right past the counter... and you get to choose any car in the aisle. choose any car? you cannot be serious! okay. seriously, you choose. go national. go like a pro. >>> mitt romney a socialist? ronald reagan a leftist dreamer? rupert murdoch jumps the shark. >>> and the west virginia warnings, the miners were worried that methane levels were far too high before the explosion. and three months ago, inspectors found the fresh air relief systems were operating backwards, blowing out breathable air from the mine. >>> federal officials saying late this afternoon it is still too dangerous to send rescue crews back into a west virginia coal mine to search for four miners after an explosion killed 25 others already discovered. three workers complained to their congressman they were worried about unsafe working co
, america. >> chris: next on "special report." president obama gets another chance to shape the supreme court, with the retirement of justice john paul stevens. one of the key congressional players in healthcare reform says he won't run again. and sarah palin fires up republicans at a convention in new orleans. live from our studio in washington, this is "special report." good evening. i'm chris wallace in for bret baier. the oldest justice on the u.s. supreme court says it is time to step down. he sent his resignation letter today to president obama. we have fox team coverage. brian wilson looked at the politics of putting a new justice on the court but we begin with james rosen at the white house on today's announcement. >> leadership will be met. >> with the retirement of the associate justice john paul stevens among serving of the supreme court members, president obama has the second chance to shape the court's direction. and he nominated sonia sotomayor last year and he said the juror will affect the daily lives of the american people. >> it will be someone who like justice stevens
rights powder keg ready to ignite all across america. >> i have instructed members of my administration to closely monitor the situation and exam the civil rights and implications of this legislation. but if we continue to fail to act at a federal level, we will continue to see misguided efforts opening up around the country. >> you can't deny it. immigration legislation has been a political land mine for politicians for years. >> i just want to make sure, do you, new york senator, support the new york governor's plan to give illegal immigrants a driver's license? you told the new hampshire paper is made a lot of sense. can you support his plan? >> you know, tim, this is where everybody plays gotchya. we have failed and george bush has failed. do i think this is the best thing for any governor to do? no. >> nobody has had the right answer for this for a long time. president obama made a promise to move on immigration reform. now he's got to live up to the promise. numbers clearly show that hispanics are the fastest growing ethnic group in the united states. they make up 46% of our popul
're going to continue to focus on bringing jobs back to america and to our people. i yield back. mr. cantor: i thank the gentleman. madam speaker, i would say this. always the gentleman likes to talk about the prior administration, and i would just like to point out that during the prior administration, the last two years of that, his party was in control of congress and certainly if we look at the numbers, did contribute to some of the problem that -- mr. hoyer: would the gentleman yield on that issue? mr. cantor: i'm not ready to yield yet, madam speaker. i would say there's plenty of blame to go around. but what we're trying to do is learn from mistakes that have taken place and go forward in a constructive manner. it's my sense that this nation is at a crossroads. we have serious challenges facing this country and last thursday was congress' deadline for passing a budget. and it is my strong belief that we must act and the gentleman indicates that we are going to act, but because of the critical nature of the challenges that we face, madam speaker, i believe that we've got three reasons
ignited a firestorm of controversy across america with copycat legislation on the way. the president put it this way -- >> you can imagine if you are hispanic-american in arizona, you're great grandparents may have been there before arizona was even a state. but now suddenly if you don't have your papers and you took your kid out to get ice cream, you're going to be harassed. that's something that could potentially happen. that's not the right way to go. >> you know, that sound bite really hit me. the magnitude of what the president just said. the president of the united states of america, just talked to people in a crowd saying you might be need something papers to stay legal in america. now the president is a constitutional scholar and a person of color. he is uniquely qualified and understands why this law is unamerican and racist. the story also has the attention of america's top law enforcement officials. he is attorney general mark holder. >> that law is an unfortunate one. i think that it is, i fear, subject to potential abuse and i'm very concerned about the wedge that it could d
for the planet it is done under our strict control and high-technology in america as opposed to in nigeria. the niger delta is polluted, the amazon basin off the coast of ecuador real new guinea -- a equatorial new guinea. in every argument, we ought to be doing here. what do you restricted and shut down the entire pacific ocean and alaska? >> what about the northeast, north atlantic? >> because this is a political and sensible statement. if it is successful and it does not cause horrible environmental damage, and the studies show that it is feasible, we move on. if it does, you stop. >> al gore said that fossil fuels are destroying our environment. >> well, he says that, yes. >> all the time. >> it is not destroying our environment. these things can be controlled. president obama has proposed -- nina is right. this is a prototype effort. it works, we will expanded. the pacific is not off limits for ever and ever, amen. >> what are we testing? we have a ton of dueling happening every day in the gulf of mexico, in a hurricane area, and it is successful. >> it is whether we can neutralize th
, look those in new york's 21st district, including my own family, to the president's family, america stands next to poland in mourning. the solidarity of the polish people in their grief is an inspiration to us all. my thoughts and prayers are with the families who lost someone. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon rise? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. defazio: the obama administration has steadfastly refused to contest the tariff of $2.4 billion levied by mexico because congress terminated the cross-border trucking program due to serious safety concerns. there is no drug testing in mexico. there are no hours of service requirements in mexico. there are no meaningful commercial driver's licenses issued in mexico to know what the record of these drivers are. congress overwhelmingly voted to terminate that program. but it's rumored the next month when the president of mexico comes, the obama administration will open the border to mexican trucks. jeopardizing the
is required now of all americans to keep america safe. listen. >> in big ways and small, resilience is a pillar of our security and there has never been a better example of that than right here in oklahoma city. >> reporter: a lot of folks are trying to still come to grips with why all of this happened. there have been a lot of discussions over the past week or so prompted by former president bill clinton's feeling about the political mood in this country, a similar mood that he says preceded this particular bombing. of course, timothy mcveigh said that the catalyst for his thinking that led to this tragedy was the april 19th, 1993 siege on the branch davidian compound in waco, texas. but however this ended, a lot of folks here want to remember the folks who gave their lives really in service to their country, tamron. >> thank you, ron mott. on this anniversary of the oklahoma city bombing we turn to the rising tide of antigovernment extremism. the southern poverty law center, which tracks antigovernment groups, say the number of so-called patriot groups across the country mushroome
advantage. to deliver technologies that anticipate the future, today. and help protect america everywhere... from the battlespace to cyberspace. around the globe, the people of boeing are working together, to give our best for america's best. that's why we're here. ♪ but we're also in the showing-kids- new-worlds business. for-barbers business. and the this-won't- hurt-a-bit business. because we don't just work here. we live here. these are our families. and our neighbors. and by changing lives we're in more than the energy business chevron. [ male announcer ] every business day, bank of america lends nearly $3 billion dollars to individuals, institutions, schools, organizations and businesses in every corner of the economy. ♪ america. growing stronger. every day. ♪ okay, we're going to get going right away. [ announcer ] he's never met an appendix he couldn't fix! the abdomen-ator dr. bob bergowitz! yeah, woo! [ announcer ] she's the queen of clean! the 2009 surgeon of the year, dr. nancy mendelsohn! [ male announcer ] doctors and nurses are true heroes. at ge, we're working to giv
in america's view of the israeli/palestinian conflict, casting it as a national security issue, directly for the united states. and the new approach comes amid talk of a new obama peace plan for the middle east. joining me to talk about all of this are rashid khalidi, professor of arab studies at columbia university and bret stephens, a frequent guest here. so, bret, what petraeus seems to be saying, look, i'm out there, i'm talking to these arab leaders. it hurts our relationship with them. it makes it more difficult for them to ally with us. they all complain about this. so he's sort of reflecting that ground reality, no? >> well, i think there's some element of truth to that. and it's certainly convenient for our political leaders to make the case that discontent in their country has to do with what settlements israel might be build in parts of jerusalem as opposed to, say, their own policies, mubarak's repression of egyptians, the repressive policies in saudi arabia. so, of course they're going to blame israel and not sort of look at their own mismanagement. and when you look at actu
to change anything on the ground. why for example, france or the united states of america are dealing with these petty monarch kiss and dealing with governments implementing them. my position is quite clear.i'm against implementing them and what i'm asking the scholars, thee things what do the texts say what are the conditions and in which context? in the same name of islam, we have to stop and to come to a moratorium on this and to have a discussion exactly like amnesty international when it comes to death penalty it is saying let us first go for a moratorium to stop it right now and then to have a discussion. >> coming up, we will have more of that interview with tarik ramadan, as well as with james zogby who is the president of the arab-american institute on the differences between islam in america and in europe. that's next. thanks for coming. it was really nice to meet you, a.j. yeah, you too. a.j.? (alarm blasting) (screaming) (phone rings) hello? this is bill with broadview security. is everything okay? no. there's this guy - he just smashed in my door. i'm sending help right n
is that this budget does not go far enough in terms of investing in america. i would go a lot further. i will offer amendments to do just that. i will tell you where we begin to get some of that money. i find it wrong that to have a situation where warren buffett, who has been before this committee, and he tells us that he pays a lower effective tax rate than does his secretary. this is the third richest guy in the world, $40 billion. does that make any sense at all? we have a situation where last year, exxonmobil, the most profitable corporation in the history of the world, not only did not pay any federal income taxes but actually received a text on last year in part by setting up tax shelters in the cayman islands and i recall that chart you have of the thousands of companies that are crowded in one building there. when you talk about investing in america, i think that is a good place to get the money. >>>none of my republican colleas are here but i find it amusing to say the least that without exception, they tell us how serious the deficit situation is. i agree with that. they have voted to re
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. caller: you asked a question, whether mr. karzai can be a credible partner for america. i think we need to reverse of that question. can america be a credible partner for karzai? because we call ourselves a nation who -- people of laws but then again we only want to apply the law to where it benefits us and anybody else that does not work. my understanding is, no. that whole part of the world over there, they know more about the correctness, to face, lined, have paucity -- to face this, lying, hypocrisy, of our own people. as long as we agree and the partners and nobody has anything else to say but america. host: hang on the line a quick second. i hear what you're saying. 20 give your reaction to a couple of things quoted by afghan president karzai here in "the wall street journal." he said obstructive intervention by foreigners in the election. he said at the paper thin curtain that separate assistance and occupation. if we don't stand for our sovereignty, it will take long before that assistance turns into occupation. and afghanistan is being used by western officials who want to inst
states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. and if you will now remain standing, it is my delight as a mother to introduce you to a young woman will be singing the national anthem. ♪ >>oh, say, can you see, by the dawn's early light, what so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming? whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight, o'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming? and the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there. o say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave o'er the land of the free and the home of the brave? ♪ [applause] great. ladies and gentlemen, that was fantastic. can we have another round of applause? [applause] >> this is a great honor for me. i am new to the stage in national politics. but i would like to say that this is the opportunity of a lifetime, because i believe the event that we are all at today is the first event on the path to taking back the congress of the
to washington, march 2 washington and sign up for the army, navy, marines. america is not free. guest: i think you raise an important point about the e- verify program. arizona it is one of the few states require a individuals to participate in this. we are opposing this kind of program to push it nationally. in the end, there are a lot of programs out there that are conditioning robust worksite and foresman, which amnesty. what we are saying is, this is the wrong approach. to some extent, they are taking me the obama administration is painting themselves into a dangerous corner by saying we are going to take the interest of illegal aliens at a hard- working families who need enforcement. if they were serious about a pathway to citizenship, they would be talking about a far more comparable to a set of measures. they would be talking about curtailing future migration of extended family relatives. meaningful reforms that have been recommended by every commission in the last 30 years to start burning some credibility into the system. instead, because of the legislation they are talking about at t
as a friend, and america is very fortunate to have his talent as secretary of agriculture. i am honored to be here, to be speaking with you. the first speaker at this club was theodore roosevelt. i do want to point out that both peter roosevelt and franklin roosevelt or assistant secretaries -- both theodore roosevelt and franklin roosevelt or assistant -- were assistant secretaries of the navy. [laughter] there was a time when the navy only had three commissioned brigades, the united states, the consolation, and the constitution. we had a tiny navy, and one which had never fought. since the days of the revolution, the navy had been pretty quiet, although you could make a pretty good argument that the reason america changed the articles of confederation to the constitution that we have today it was because we could not build a national and navy to deal with the barbary pirates. that was one reason for the changes in philadelphia in 1789. in 1798, then secretary of the navy had three ships, a few marines to sail on those ships, and a decidedly limited navy. today, things have changed a l
america should wake up and care about what's going on today. >> well, i think we should care about what's going on today because anything that reduces the level of international tension or the threat of rogue nuclear weapons in the hands of whomever is a good day for people who enjoy living the lives we lead and the way we lead them. >> yeah. of course, the big concern when you talk about nuclear weapons today, as opposed to -- you know, when you were a teenager in 1947, from -- obviously, we had inspector of nuclear wars from 1940s through christmas day 1991 when soviet union collapsed but you just said it, big concern is nuclear weapons getting in the hands of rogue nations. >> that's an interesting point you just raised. because there are so many people in this country, specifically, i'd say over the age of 50 or 55 years of age, who have had their entire lives framed by the cold war and the threat of nuclear weapons from growing up in grammar school, getting positioned under the desk when they had the civil defense exercises to today when, you know, we have so much opportunity and s
that any of this is working? how is america safer today because we call this encountering violent extremism instead of islamic radicalism. >> what makes america safe is when the rest of the world does not trust us and they think we are at war with islam. if you are islamic nation you are not going to work with the united states on the level that we need to. obama is trying to reset that relationship. it's going to take time and not happen overnight. >> laura: lawyer we hear that about a lot of things it's not going to happen overnight. >> a lot of tough problems out there. no one expects. >> laura: talks going better because of this? >> this is a direct outreach to the muslim community around the world. >> laura: at some point you need a report card, nancy. >> want them to stop financing terrorism. safe haven. work with -- not against iraq. >> laura: obama administration's goal is to reach out, work with more people to try to tamp down and defeat this type of extremism. at some point -- you have to stop with the bush bashing because it's getting really old and tedious to a lot of people and
agenda? we'll talk about that tonight. >>> another hot topic is america a christian nation? that question prompted by the raging controversy over, of all things, the national day of prayer. just yesterday, the army disinvited evangelist franklin graham from the pentagon's event. graham has made some pretty controversial comments about islam, some of this show actually where he called it a very violent religion. so is america really one nation under god? >>> and on a very different note tonight, the supermodel who is taking potshots at celebrity plastic surgeries. paulina porizkova is here with very surprising and candid thoughts on true beauty. lots to get to. but we begin with "the mash-up." our number one international story, the deadliest day of the year in iraq. at least 61 people died. more than 100 were wounded in a wave of bombings in baghdad and nearby anbar province. >> just days after the killings of the two top al qaeda leaders in iraq, a wave of bombings have left dozens dead in baghdad and neighboring anbar province. >> mangled cars, buses clogging the streets outside two mos
of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain up to 10 requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon rise? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so approved. mr. defazio: well, all america has heard about too big to fail and they're still pretty angry about that in the bailout of wall street. now there is a new deal with lexicon thanks to goldman sachs and that is designed to fail for profit. goldman sachs worked with a hedge fund manager who put together a collateralize debt obligation that he hand picked because he thought they would fail. goldman got a fee for putting them together, goldman sold him insurance or bets against him and then goldman sold to unknowing investors those same securities as great investments. we are thankful that the securities and exchange commission is back on the beat after a long nap under the bush administration and chris
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